Monthly Archives: September 2018

How I Run Class Now

I do things very differently than even a few years ago, so I wanted to share how my class is run now that I’ve experimented with a flipped classroom for a few years. I teach both Algebra 1 and Honors Precalculus using these strategies.

Summary

  • Flipped classroom with guided notes and PlayPosit within Schoology
  • #VNPS (a.k.a. whiteboards around the room) random grouping for practice
  • Mix of 3Act Lessons and Desmos Activities as discovery lessons when appropriate
  • Warm-ups through a Google document which include:
  • Self-graded quizzes every Friday

Flipped Classroom

I typed up Guided Notes and used Doceri on the iPad to create a short video of me explaining the notes while writing them out. Doceri is awesome (for lots of reasons) in part because I can write out what I want ahead of time and mark “stopping points”. Then when I go to record my voice, I just click “play” to the next stopping point and what I want students to write is written out quickly to match the speed of my voice.

Here’s all my Algebra videos on a Youtube playlist so you can see what I mean.

Then, I put the video into PlayPosit, which allows me to insert questions for the students to respond to. PlayPosit also allows me to see which questions they got right and wrong, how much video they watch, how long it took them to watch that video, and how long it took them to answer each question. There’s even space for them to type an explanation if they get a question wrong, so I know they’re watching and paying attention and thinking about the math, even if they don’t get it yet.

PlayPosit is what our district pays for, but I did all of this in EDPuzzle for free first.

#VNPS (Vertical Non-Permanent Surfaces) and Random Grouping for Practice

I have whiteboards on all 4 walls of my room. There are shelves and things, but I would say roughly 60-70% of the wall space is whiteboards where students can write.

When students come into class, I’ve already checked whether they watched the PlayPosit video and put them into random groups if they have done the HW. If they haven’t finished the HW, they sit down and do it, and I make a note to make a phone call home.

The problems are on a document within Schoology (our LMS), but I used to hand out sheets of paper for each group. I have rules like “only one whiteboard marker per group” and “trade off the marker after every question” and “all heads in–everyone is working on every problem”. Of course, I also have Sarah Carter’s awesome “Class Norms” posters up in the room, though I am currently working on improving group work for my younger classes (9th graders).

Self-Graded Quizzes every Friday

I think I got the self-grading idea from Megan Hayes-Golding. I leave a few copies of answer keys at the back of the room and have felt-tipped pens (mine are blue) next to the keys. Students are to leave any pen or pencil at their desk when they go to correct themselves. “Self-grade” is a bit of a misnomer because I really want them to self-correct. I give them a point for doing this process correctly (out of 4 total possible points!) so I show them it’s very important [1]. In my flavor of SBG (Standard Based Grading) students are allowed to retake quizzes as often as they’d like, but they need to demonstrate some practice first.

Summary

Overall, my classroom is more chaotic than most, especially for a math teacher, but I think learning is happening lots. And not just learning math, but learning to communicate with others, to teach, to lead, to learn, and to be responsible for your own education.

[1] If students run out of time, I will grade it for them, but most students are able to grade themselves and get instant feedback.

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