Tag Archives: 8th Grade Math

[DITL] 5/22/17

6:00 am

Woke up at my usual time. It feels like it should be the end of the year, but we have 3 weeks of school left, so I’ve got to figure out how to motivate myself in order to motivate my students to try through to the end. This week is exam week at my last school, so it would already be the end of the year if we had stayed in New Mexico.

 

7:52 am

Students start coming into class and the morning lesson from admin is to vote on rising 6th and 7th grade students. It does not make a lot of sense for my 8th graders to care about the election, but they care more than I thought the would, so I appreciate their efforts.

 

8:40 am, 1st & 2nd period, planning

We have a diversity training. I already heard this from my “First year teacher” course, though it is new to most of my colleagues. The best time in the 45 minute session is 3 minutes where they ask us to share something meaningful with our colleagues. I wish we could have more time set aside for just that because we can learn so much more from personal stories.

 

10:20 am, 3rd period, Merit 8th Grade Math

The students are unfocused. There are always 5 different conversations going on at once and they are unable to stay quiet for more than 2 minutes at a time to listen to my explanation of what we’re doing today. It’s become my roughest period by far. A few students have their phones out and I struggle to ask them to put them away. After five minutes some of the phones return. I know at least one student is having a bad enough day that he might go off if I take his phone again. I decide to ignore him and his phone this time. [1]

 

In this class we did a “hand squeeze” activity, where students stood in a circle and we timed how long it took them to squeeze each other’s hands all the way around the circle. The goal was to create (in Desmos) a scatterplot with a strong positive linear correlation: the more people in the circle, the longer it should take to go around. Here’s a Desmos graph to go along with some of our data (I couldn’t convince everyone in the class to stand up and be willing to hold hands).

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11:10 am, 4th period, Honors 8th Grade Math

This used to be one of the class I had the hardest time getting them to focus, but now they’ve done pretty well for the last several months. Phone calls home to this group really help and I’m staying in daily contact home with at least one of the students.

 

In this class we’re doing our end of year stats project. This involves finding two things to compare to each other via a scatterplot and creating a few questions for their classmates to answer.

 

12:00 pm, 5th period, Algebra

My Algebra students took their PARCC test (part 1 of 3) this morning and are taking part 2 in the afternoon. Since this is during their lunch time, they had to have their lunch during 5th period, so they just hung out and ate in my room. One student said “this is the best class of the year!”

 

12:50 pm, Lunch

Three students came into my room for “tutoring”–however, for these three regulars, they just hang out in my room. We got to have a discussion about various topics, such as religion (since they ask), friends, and family.

 

1:23 pm, 6th period, Honors 8th Grade Math

Just as before, we’re doing the stats project. I walk around the room, but this class has a harder time figuring out what they’re doing.

 

2:13 pm, 7th period, 8th Grade Math

This class is not as loud as 3rd period and we get much farther in the “Hand Squeeze” assignment. We just need to discuss the conclusion, but they’re ready to start the next assignment!

 

3:00pm

The end of the day bell rings and I go through my after school routine. Here’s my current checklist:

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The email addresses are students that I contact daily, blurred out for obvious reasons.

I get to go home about 2 hours after the students are done. Tonight I need to grade Friday’s quizzes, figure out lesson plans for tomorrow’s Merit classes, and sign up students for tutoring who didn’t take the quiz on Friday.

Just 13 more days to go!

 

[1] I ended up making a positive phone call after school. I hope to hold it up to him tomorrow and point out that I could have called about his phone being out, but I want him to succeed. I need to keep trying to build relationships even if we’re in the last 3 weeks of school. This also helps me to feel that I haven’t given up on him: I ignored his lack of effort in class, but didn’t ignore it after school and won’t tolerate more than one day of being angry as an excuse.

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[3 Act Lesson] Sandboxes: Volume of Cylinders (& Spheres)

In middle school we only get 47 minutes, which is not enough time for the 3-act lessons I had gotten used to (coming from 90 minute blocks!). After a 5 minute warm-up, and 5 minutes of going over HW, that leaves no time for a lesson. But today I think I was able to get all three acts in, so I wanted to share my success!

We’re doing volume of cylinders, cones, and spheres in 8th grade math right now.

Act 1

Me: Spring break is next week, and here’s my Spring Break plans.

Image result for sand box

Students: You’re going to the beach?

Me: Nope, I’m going to build a sandbox for Benji (my 2-year-old). What do you think is the most expensive part of the sandbox?

Students (in unison, surprisingly): The Sand!

Me: Right, so forget the wood for now because I have enough scrap wood that I can probably build the frame without buying any wood. My wife and I are trying to decide between a 6’x6′ and an 8’x8′ sandbox.

Student: 8’x8′ cause it’s bigger, duh!

Another Student: But that would cost more!

Me: What do you need to know to find out how much more it would cost?

Student: How much all the sand costs.

Me: Right. You don’t buy “one sandbox worth of sand” at Lowes. It comes in bags.

 

Eventually they get to needing (1) how much is in a bag (0.5 cubic feet worth of sand), (2) how deep is the sand in the sandbox (6 inches), (3) how much each bag costs ($4.25 is what I found at the local Lowes).

We did the comparison together because we were so short on time. If we had a block period, then I would have let them struggle instead, but I wanted them to get to calculating volume of cylinders in context instead. The work I write on the board looks something like this:

6’x6′x0.5′

18 cubic feet

36 bags

$153 is the total cost for a 6’x6′

8’x8′x0.5′

32 cubic feet

64 bags

$272 is the total cost for an 8’x8′

We have a brief discussion answering “why is $272 nearly double $153 but 8′ isn’t nearly double 6′?” Unfortunately I pointed this out to them and had to start the discussion but it’s something that I feel is important enough for me to “artificially” bring up.

Act 2

Now I want you to get one large (4’x2′) whiteboard for your table, one marker, and make a cost comparison between a 6′ diameter circular sand box and an 8′ diameter circular sandbox. Go!

Image result for sand box circular

The students did a really good job (we’ve been practicing finding the volume of cylinders).

Here’s some of their work (I’m sharing the more legible ones)

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Act 3

As students finished, I gave them this challenge problem:

“Suppose the silo at our farm is filled with sand. How many 8’x8′ rectangular sandboxes could we fill with all that sand?”

I draw a picture of a silo (hemisphere sitting on a cylinder) with cylindrical height of 20′ and overall diameter of 10′. As you can see from the pictures above, some students did pretty well at that problem, too!

Analysis

The students were really interested in my spring break plans. The “builders” of the class liked the idea of figuring out how to get ready to build a project, even if it was just buying sand. The “caretakers” of the class like that I was doing something for my 2-year-old. Get enough of the students on board and they all really take to it, and I was fortunately that this happened here. Here’s the google slides I used for the lesson.

How would you improve it? Alter it? Thanks for any and all feedback!

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[DITL] The Last Day Before Thankgiving

6:00 I wake up to my watch alarm and get ready for school. I turn my phone alarm off before it goes off and notice Glenn Waddell’s reminder email to blog a DITL today. I brush my teeth before eating breakfast because I’m not quite awake. I’m surprised I don’t do that more often.

While showering I debate the ethics and usefulness of doing a warm-up on the Pythagorean Theorem very similar to one of the county-mandated Benchmark tests. I decide to do the warm-up for Merit but not for Honors.

7:05 When I get to school, a fellow teacher comes in to get the Chromebook cart back. I had taken it out of her room since I signed up for it today, but I didn’t notice that she had it signed out for ELT (homeroom). I apologize and later she even brought the cart back to me.

Last night I had the idea to post the agenda to Google Classroom each day. It took 15 seconds and has the HW on there as well as our “essential question” and what we did for the day. I think I’ll do that more often as a resource for absent students.

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I make copies for the day: test correction forms for ELT, quizzes for Algebra I, and Mathcounts materials for after school.

7:52 Students start coming in for ELT–the 10 minutes when they hear the announcements and see which classes they’re going to (sometimes students are pulled for tutoring). I always have to quiet down one pocket of boys. I patiently “shush” the same student over and over during the morning announcements.

8:05 My 7th period comes in (it’s their turn in the ELT rotation) and we start working on test corrections. They took the test over a week ago, but this was the first time I was able to work with them during ELT, and it took a long time to grade online, so I decided to wait until now. I would write the work up around the room and they copied down the right answer onto their test corrections. I wonder how much they’re getting out of it just copying down what I write, but when I ask them to figure it out on their own, I end up helping them all out and saying the same thing 18 times. On the sheet they have to answer summary questions such as “how do you find the slope from an equation”, so hopefully that helps.

8:38 I have 1st and 2nd period planning. I talk with the other 8th grade teacher about what we’re doing next week and finish what I didn’t get printed earlier. I make keys for Algebra I so they can grade themselves after they take the quiz.

10:17 My 3rd period students start trickling in and I try to direct their attention to the problem on the board that is so similar to the benchmark question that it makes me queasy thinking about it. I’m optimistic but I fear that at least 1/3 of the students in the room won’t understand it even though I go right over it and another third will forget how to do it 15 minutes later when they see in on the test.

The students start out by finishing their test they started yesterday on paper. When they finish the paper, they’re to get a Chromebook and put their benchmark answers into the computer test (setup on Google Classroom). One of the problems is tricky to type in so I ask every student to show me #7. Yes, it’s faster to do that than for me to go back afterwards and change every student’s answer.

Once they finish with the test, they’re to check their grades online and look for missing assignments/missing quiz corrections.

After they do all of that, they’re allowed to play Prodigy.

Algebra is the only class that’s not taking a benchmark rigth now. I try a different warm-up today: Warm-up by checking your HW answers with the other students at your table. It works okay. We quickly go over the HW. Then I show them “my favorite mistakes” from the tickets out, the day before, encouraging them not to make the same mistakes on the quiz.

After the Algebra students take their quiz, they check their work and get a TenMarks username and password to start some practice problems on TenMarks.

12:10 At lunch I offer to tutor a student who was really struggling with 2-step equations. I like to avoid the (often) negative atmosphere of the teacher’s lounge, so this is a double bonus for me.

After lunch, we repeat with my last two classes.

3:00 Mathcounts has a small showing today (only 5 of the 12 members) because the morning announcements sounded like “afternoon activities are cancelled” when it really said “afternoon activity buses are cancelled”. It’s fun doing the math with them and seeing the expressions on their faces. This time one student had 2 riddles for his fellow students, so I printed them off and let them go at it the last 10 minutes.

4:15 I start to tackle this “end of the day to-do list”. It only takes about an hour. I use Google Keep for this, so I can “uncheck all boxes” when I’m done to reuse the list the next day.

  • Take attendance
  • Send Remind.com message
  • Write the next day’s Daily Agenda on the Wall
  • Get Tickets Out
  • Make One Positive Phone Call (remember that parents CARE about their kids and you enjoy this!)
  • Enter Tutoring List
  • Steps? (this is for behavior)
  • Email *****’s parents (student)
  • Email $$$$$’s parents (student)
  • Email %%%%’s parents (student)

I have three trouble students who I’ve found that a daily email home is the best strategy to keep them focused as much as possible. Also those three parents really appreciate the emails.

5:15ish I start to tackle my “end of week” checklist, again on Google Keep.

  • Print New Attendance Sheets
  • Get All the Turned in Work
  • Write next week’s Birthdays on the wall
  • Plug in HW grades for the week
  • Put Warm-ups on Google Classroom
  • Mentor Log?
  • Clean Up
  • Put times next to anything on the to-do list for the weekend

Most of these are faster because it was a 2-day week.

I get to go home around 5:30pm. There’s just a tiny bit of light from the sun which set a while ago when I step outside. I notice that my car is the only one in the lot and briefly wonder if I’m doing something wrong. I’m working full-time after school to get all those things above that NEED to be done: so why am I last to leave? I’m a fairly fast worker.

I play with Benji (2 and a half years old yesterday) and Daniel (4 months) in the evening and type up this blog post at 11pm, when I should be sleeping. We’re driving to Roanoke, VA tomorrow to visit family for Thanksgiving and I need the sleep for the drive. At least I have 5 days off before the next day of school.

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